Serving the Greater Cincinnati Area
Main Number & Emergencies
513-931-0775

Common
Medical Conditions

Specialized medical practice dealing with unique allergic or immunologic diseases.
Learn Morewhite arrow

Treatments and
Therapies

Approximately 50 million Americans suffer from allergic diseases.
Learn Morewhite arrow

Special Procedures
and Testing

Find our the special procedures and testing we provide.
Learn Morewhite arrow

Patient Tips to Remember: Allergy and Asthma Medication

If you are one of the more than 50 million people in the United States suffering from allergies and/or asthma, there are many different medications that can help you feel better. In order to determine which medications are right for you, it is important to understand what triggers your symptoms. An allergist/immunologist, often referred to as an allergist, is the best physician to choose the appropriate treatment plan for controlling your allergies and asthma.

Antihistamines

If you have allergies, your allergist may prescribe an antihistamine. This medication treats allergic rhinitis ("hay fever") and conditions such as hives. Antihistamines help prevent the effects of histamine, which is a chemical released by your body during an allergic reaction. By preventing the action of histamine, your allergy symptoms can be reduced. Antihistamines are available as a liquid, tablet or nasal spray.

Antihistamines are divided into:

Potential side effects (usually associated with the "first generation" antihistamines):

Decongestants

These medications may reduce your stuffy nose and other symptoms associated with allergies. Decongestants work by narrowing your blood vessels, which decreases the amount of fluid that leaks out into the lining of your nose. They are available as a liquid, tablet or nasal spray.

Potential side effects:

"Controller" Medications

If you have allergies or asthma, inflammation causes swelling and mucous production in the lining of your nose and airways, creating your symptoms. There are three classes of medications that can help prevent or reduce this inflammation.

Bronchodilators

If you have asthma, the smooth muscle surrounding your airways can tighten, making it hard for you to breathe. These medications relax this muscle, improving air flow and helping you breathe. There are several classes of bronchodilators to treat asthma.

Beta-agonist bronchodilators relax the smooth muscle surrounding your bronchial tubes. Short-acting beta-agonist bronchodilators are used as quick-relief medications. These are available as inhalations, liquids, injectables and pills.

Long-acting beta-agonists bronchodilators (LABAs), such as salmeterol and formoterol, are used for long-term control of asthma. These medications are ordinarily meant to be used together with an anti-inflammatory medication on a regular (daily), rather than as-needed basis. These long-acting bronchodilators are available in combination with a corticosteroid within one inhaler.

Anti-IgE Antibody

IgE, an antibody that we all produce, is responsible for causing symptoms of allergic diseases. Omalizumab is a class of drugs, known as "anti-IgE," for patients with moderate to severe persistent allergic asthma. Anti-IgE may reduce allergic reactions by binding free IgE because bound IgE cannot produce an allergic reaction. In many cases, omalizumab has been shown to reduce the need for inhaled corticosteroids, while protecting against allergic disease symptoms.

Theophylline

For many years before the arrival of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting bronchodilators, a commonly used medication was theophylline. Those individuals who are still on this medication need careful monitoring.

Anticholinergic Agents

Although not usually used as a first-line bronchodilator to treat chronic asthma, anticholinergic agents have been used with beta-agonists for the emergency treatment of acute asthma exacerbations. They are available in inhaled form and can be used alone or combined with the beta-agonist bronchodilators.

Healthy Tips

Feel Better, Live Better

An allergist/immunologist, often referred to as an allergist, is a pediatrician or internist with at least two additional years of specialized training in the diagnosis and treatment of problems such as allergies, asthma, autoimmune diseases and the evaluation and treatment of patients with recurrent infections, such as immunodeficiency diseases.

The right care can make the difference between suffering with an allergic disease and feeling better. By visiting the office of an allergist, you can expect an accurate diagnosis, a treatment plan that works and educational information to help you manage your disease.

In-Office Appointments

Dr. David Bernstein

ZocDoc

Dr. Jonathan Bernstein

ZocDoc

Dr. Justin Greiwe

ZocDoc

Telemedicine Appointments

ZocDoc

Telemedicine appointments are for existing patients only and will cost either $100 or $140 per visit depending on the complexity of your health issue. The appropriate charge will be determined by the treating physician at the time of your visit.

CURRENT PATIENTS CLICK HERE
TO LEAVE A MESSAGE ON OUR PATIENT PORTAL

NEW PATIENTS CAN
CALL US AT 513-931-0775

CONTACT US TODAY
FOR YOUR
APPOINTMENT!

Schedule an Appointment Main Number & Emergencies
513-931-0775
leave a message and someone will call you back as soon as possible. Please see our office locations and convenient hours.

Bernstein Clinical Research Center, LLC

The Bernstein Clinical Research Center has been conducting clinical research studies since 1969. Our Center has conducted over 700 clinical trials in adult and pediatric patients and we have contributed to the development of new therapies for asthma, allergic rhinitis, eczema, hives, other skin conditions and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

SEE IF YOU QUALIFY FOR AN INVESTIGATIONAL RESEARCH STUDY!

Enter Sitegreen arrow